Preconference

Kick off the 2019 ICMA Annual Conference with preconference opportunities on Saturday, October 19 and Sunday, October 20.

Please Note: Some preconference sessions require separate registration and may require payment. You can complete this process through registration checkout.
Choose the Best Preconference Learning Experience for You

ICMA University workshops offer interactive, intensive training designed to develop skills and enhance knowledge. They support ICMA members’ commitment to career-long learning by addressing the ICMA Practices for Effective Local Government Leadership, and each workshop description includes the practice groups the workshop addresses. Instructors are selected for their knowledge of the topic, understanding of local government issues, and proven ability to effectively teach adults.

Because workshops are not supported by conference registration fees and must be self-supporting, there is an additional registration fee ($195) for each half-day workshop unless otherwise noted. This fee covers the cost of audiovisual equipment rental; refreshments; instructor travel, lodging, and honoraria; handouts and certificates; and any other costs specific to the workshops.

Saturday, Oct. 19, 8:30 a.m.-noon

How Many Police and Fire Chiefs Do You Really Need?

How many police and firefighters do you really need? How well are your public safety departments performing? Are “officers per 1,000” and “number of calls” really meaningful measures? Workshop leaders will tackle these questions while cutting through the jargon of the emergency services management field, an area in which few managers have training. You and your staff will learn how to establish goals and priorities, quantify workloads, get the metrics you need from police and fire departments, and more. This workshop will be led by two former city managers and public safety officials with extensive experience in local governments around the United States.

Workshop Leader: Leonard Matarese, Managing Partner, Center for Public Safety Management, Washington, D.C.

Delivering Great Results from Your Vision and Strategic Plan

Organizational excellence requires that managers focus both on delivering results from their vision and strategic plan and on developing the culture of their organizations. This session will focus on creating results from your vision by focusing on work to understand and delight your customers, cascading your vision and strategic plan throughout the organization, maximizing individual and team performance, and utilizing transformational performance measures to lead your organization toward excellence. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Jeff Parks, president, Performance Breakthroughs, Woodbridge, Virginia

False Precision: Why 73% of the Data You Use to Make Decisions Is Misleading and Misinterpreted … and How You Can Detect It and Fight Back

We are deluged with data; even simple decisions require mountains of information. Much of it is helpful, providing needed context for complex issues, and 94.7% is accurate. But we too rarely step back and ask if the data is truly relevant and responds to the questions being asked, even if we sense that something isn’t quite right. And so we are regularly and unknowingly misled and misdirected by our misunderstanding and misuse of data. Using numerous examples from communities like yours, we’ll try to find insights into how to better question, detect, and challenge “bad data” and provide policymakers with the information they really need to formulate policy choices.

Topics may include census data, budgeting, revenue calculation, transportation analyses, income distribution, homelessness and poverty, development fees, housing prices, performance metrics, false precision, how polling works and when it doesn’t, how data graphs can be accidentally or purposely misleading, the endless collection of “best of” lists and why they’re almost always meaningless, a bit of fun with probability and statistics (no math needed here, just some curiosity), and a look at a wide variety of news articles that rely on seemingly precise numbers. Attendees are encouraged to bring examples from their communities to this very interactive session, where together we’ll puzzle out the ways that seemingly accurate data can still be so misleading. Oh … and if you didn’t immediately recognize the two percentages noted above as examples of our problem, this class is for you. Practice Groups: 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9

Workshop Leader: Matt Appelbaum, former council member and mayor, Boulder, Colorado

From Sleepy to Chic: Making Main Street Cool

This workshop is a case study of how Berlin, Maryland, transitioned from a sleepy community to a tourist destination using partnerships with local businesses, government agencies, and civic leaders. The town leveraged its successful Main Street program and partnered with Worcester County’s Department of Tourism to be voted America’s Coolest Small Town in 2014, becoming an overnight success that was 30 years in the making. Berlin used the key elements of placemaking to transform its community. The audience will develop a checklist of steps to take to create a strong sense of place, so you can too. Practice Group: 2

Workshop Leader: Laura Allen, town administrator, Berlin, Maryland

Local Government Run Social Media and Online Technologies: Tools for Proactively Building Strategic and Creative Citizen Engagement

Negativity, rumor, fake news, misrepresented real news, personal attacks, and viral messaging spread what feels like a virus around the goodwill that local governments are trying to show through their communications. The dangers of unmanaged electronic conversations can be mitigated. Embracing effective communication strategies for social media and creating online engagement platforms can effectively promote transparency, collaboration, interaction, and broader participation. In this session, participants will learn about and experience effective use of words, images, and videos for both social media communications and online engagement. These new strategies will aid organizations in moving toward the positive outcomes many yearn for, such as broadening reach and increasing diversity of participation while mitigating the legal, ethical, professional, and personal vulnerability associated with extreme openness. Practice Groups: 6, 14

Workshop Leaders: Thomas Bryer, PhD, professor, Deliberative Democracy Centers, University of Florida, Orlando, Florida; Sarah Stoeckel, PhD, council member, Titusville, Florida

The Value of a Good Story

The presenter, a credentialed manager with more than forty years of city management experience, learned some of his most valuable career lessons from stories told and retold over the years by his mentors and colleagues in the municipal management profession—sometimes in conference sessions and as often as not during evening gatherings in the hotel lounge. Using as a prompt two case studies he has co-authored for ICMA texts and relying on interaction and feedback from workshop participants, the presenter leads participants in an exploration of ethical leadership principles and related management skills. Practice Groups: 1, 8, 14

Workshop Leader: William Bridgeo, city manager, Augusta, Maine

Six Ways to Engineer Employee Engagement

Government organizations are often encouraged to institutionalize best practices, freeze them into place, focus on execution, increase predictability, and get processes under control. However, governments today face a radically shifting context for the workforce, the workplace, and the world of community building. To move forward toward better government, leaders must be vigilant and disrupt the fossilized mental model of “we’ve always done it that way,” replace it with a forward-looking approach to continuous improvement, and transform their workplace culture from the status quo to the “status go”! Healthy cultures lift people up, expand the capacity of the workforce to execute new challenges, and enhance the organization’s performance overall. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Patrick Ibarra, cofounder and partner, The Mejorando Group, Glendale, Arizona

What Emergency? What Local Government Managers Should Know in Times of Crisis

Disasters strike in many forms—floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, severe heat, severe cold, snow, drought, wildfires, and human-made events. No community is immune to crisis, and changing environmental conditions have already affected many areas of the country. This program is designed to engage and instruct local government leaders in the area of crisis leadership. Participants will leave with an understanding of:

  • Who should be on your team? There is no “I” in emergency events.
  • Have you developed a communication plan and process?
  • What is the role of local government? State government? The federal government?
  • Do you know what assistance and requirements will follow from FEMA
  • For your business community—have they prepared? Have you integrated their needs into your plan? What role does the Small Business Administration play in disaster recovery?
  • When the disaster cycle is discussed—what is it? How does your community fit? What is your role?
  • What can you do before, during, and after events?
  • Will/how does a community recover after a crisis?

These and other topics will be discussed during this workshop. It is ideal for new managers, for managers looking to update plans, or for your staff who may be joining you for the conference. Remember: all disasters start and end at the local level. Practice Groups: 6, 7, 10

Workshop Leader: Tom Wieczorek, principal, Center for Public Safety Management, LLC, Washington, D.C.

Saturday, Oct. 19, 1-4:30 p.m.

Gauging Public Opinion the Right Way

Local government leaders get resident opinions every day. From traditional public comments at council meetings to social media and digital town halls, vocal residents find ways to express their opinions about their cities and towns. But is reacting only to those “squeaky wheels” enough to benefit the entire community? The truth is, opinions provided in these formats don’t often represent all residents. That makes it easy for thousands of constituent voices to go unheard. Fortunately, there are more effective, inclusive, and systematic ways to harness resident opinion. In this workshop, experts from National Research Center, Inc., will share tried-and-true public engagement methods including surveys (mail, phone, and web), focus groups, and panels. You’ll discover ways to use existing technology such as your website, Nextdoor, and other social media platforms to engage residents in cost-effective ways that do not rely solely on the leanings of a vocal few. This workshop will cover the methods for capturing resident opinion, and also how to use this crucial resource to move forward on strategic planning, performance measurement, and policy analysis. Join us and other local change-makers in making communities better places to live for all residents and stakeholders. Practice Groups: 7, 11

Workshop Leader: Michelle Kobayashi, vice president, National Research Center, Inc., Boulder, Colorado

How to Lead Like a Coach

There are times when a few highly productive people know how to successfully complete projects on their own or with a few coworkers, and not include the rest of the team along the way. This type of leadership can leave other coworkers feeling left out, ignored, or even frustrated with their jobs.

In this workshop we will motivate attendees to sharpen the existing leadership tools in their personal toolbox as well as look within themselves to find existing leadership traits they may not have known were in their “toolbox of life.” We will discuss real life examples of what has worked and what has not worked when operating as a team, and we will examine successful strategies and best practices of leadership, coaching team building, and coworker inclusion. Practice groups: 4, 5, 13

Workshop Leader: LaTonya Pegues, founder and CEO, Boaz Enterprises, Austin, Texas

Leading Together: A New Model for Governing and Managing Your Community

Learn how an integrated strategic planning system, internationally recognized board governance model, and the innovative Budget Based Option System (BOBs) can improve community governance and management. Participants will learn how to use these tools to jointly set result-oriented management priorities and outcomes between the elected board and the manager. This is a “hands on” interactive session taught by a current elected official and former city manager who consult nationally with clients that have successfully implemented the integrated strategic management system and the tools that support its effectiveness. Participants will learn how these tools work and have opportunities to discuss in small groups how they might be used in their communities. Practice Group: 6

Workshop Leaders: Mike Letcher, senior vice president, and William Stipp, senior vice president, The Mercer Group, Tucson, Arizona

Moving from Success to Significance

We all know that happiness is not about money or fame. It is about living a purpose-driven life. Imagine a world in which we all lived out our purpose. Most of us do not realize that we are unique and can impact the world in a way no one else can. Learn to unleash this potential in you, your agency, and in others. Turn your career into a calling and inspire others to do the same. Practice Group: 5

Workshop Leader: Rob Dayton, certified strength coach, Santa Barbara, California

Organizational Culture: Is There a Secret Recipe?

Organization-wide collaboration, information sharing, and the development of shared goals require trust among employees at all levels. But how do we encourage and cultivate this trust in an environment where it is lacking? Are you struggling with organizational silos and poor communication between departments? Do you have a sense of your organization’s culture? This workshop will hone the ambiguous concept of organizational culture. Program participants will learn about culture assessment tools and engage in small-group discussions focused on moving your organization to higher performance through culture change. We assess our systems and processes, why not our culture? In this workshop, we will explore how to ignite and lead culture change in our organizations, creating an environment of trust, cooperation, and purpose. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Brian Bosshardt, city manager, Bedford, Texas

Tackling Wicked Problems in Local Communities: Building Capacity for Deliberative Engagement

This workshop is focused on building local capacity to engage difficult issues more collaboratively and productively through the use of deliberative engagement processes. Deliberative engagement involves interactive, often facilitated, small-group discussions utilizing materials and processes designed to spark collaborative learning rather than merely the collection of individual opinions. We will examine the concept of “wicked problems” as a framework to better understand difficult issues and then review recent research on social psychology to help explain why traditional engagement processes are often counterproductive to supporting the high-quality communication required by democracy and wicked problems. The workshop will then review the key components of deliberative engagement and explore a variety of tools and techniques drawn from several dialogue and deliberation traditions. Practice Group: 2

Workshop Leader: Martin Carusson, professor, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado

The Tools of Good Governance: What Every Manager Needs to Know

Every municipal manager wants to be judged as successful by his or her council and feel within themselves that their career has been one of effective service. This workshop will provide you with tools for effective management and better governance. The session will include some of George Cuff’s helpful suggestions and wisdom on the importance of effective council meetings, use of policies, use of protocols, proper agenda building, better use of management meetings, mayor-manager briefings, and other topics. The session will also draw a few examples from Cuff’s immensely popular sessions on “Fatal Flaws” in terms of what does not go well.

The presenter has a well-deserved North American reputation as a governance and senior management expert on the principles that undergird an effective, healthy relationship. He has served as both a mayor and a municipal manager and has written extensively on topics relevant to both. Practice Groups: 1, 2, 5, 7, 6, 9

Workshop Leader: George Cuff, FCMC, Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada

We’ve Always Done It That Way is Over

Government organizations are often encouraged to institutionalize best practices, freeze them into place, focus on execution, increase predictability, and get processes under control. However, governments today face a radically shifting context for the workforce, the workplace, and the world of community building. To move forward toward better government, leaders must be vigilant and disrupt the fossilized mental model of “we’ve always done it that way,” replace it with a forward-looking approach to continuous improvement, and transform their workplace culture from the status quo to the “status go”! Healthy cultures lift people up, expand the capacity of the workforce to execute new challenges, and enhance the organization’s performance overall. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Patrick Ibarra, cofounder and partner, The Mejorando Group, Glendale, Arizona

Sunday, Oct. 20, 8:30 a.m.–noon

Building Brands and Creating Cultures of Authentic Servant Leadership

Your investment in the culture and environment where your teams spend more waking hours than they do at home with their families is your most valuable contribution as a servant leader. If you don’t have the right brand, both externally and internally, you won’t attract the right people. If you don’t have the right people, or people with the right priorities, you can’t create or sustain a thriving culture.

Branding and culture, particularly for public-serving organizations and people-serving leaders, are interdependent. In today’s highly competitive market for talent, your brand and your culture are critical to your organization’s ability to thrive. This is not a “should” session, it is a “how” session. Attendees will leave with concrete ways to use the talent within their organizations to pursue a grassroots brand transformation that will orient the culture toward servant leadership. Practice Groups: 4, 13

Workshop Leader: Stacy Schweikhart, community information officer, Kettering, Ohio

Design Thinking

How does design influence engagement, culture, and innovation? Design Thinking focuses on developing a deep understanding of the customer experience and of how customers interact with your service or product. Use Design Thinking principles to breathe life back into customer engagement. Learn how others have created innovative services using a Design Thinking process, and participate in a hands-on activity that demonstrates that process. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leaders: Pamela Antil, assistant city administrator, Santa Barbara, California; Kathy Lang, IT Manager, San José, California

ICMA Annual Leadership Institute

The ICMA Annual Leadership Institute provides an opportunity to connect members across generations and experience levels who share an interest in and commitment to leadership development. The institute requires a separate registration fee of $195.

Leading through Conflict to Shared Victory

You can’t lead an organization without leading its people. How are you leading your employees? How are you leading your executive team? How is your executive team leading the organization?

Gain strategies for attacking the root causes of organizational politics, operational confusion, siloed mentalities, and dysfunctional office politics.

Practice techniques for navigating conflict with others and nurturing an environment that welcomes healthy, respectful debate.

Reimagine the power of clarifying priorities, crystalizing values, and cascading communication to lead your people so they begin rowing together in the same direction.

This workshop will introduce best practices in executive leadership, communication, and team building; provide you with an opportunity to practice new skills; and send you back to your home jurisdiction with a new strategy for success. Practice Group: 6

Workshop Leader: Michelle Poché Flaherty, deputy city manager, Palo Alto, California

Leading Together: A New Model for Governing and Managing Your Community

Learn how an integrated strategic planning system, internationally recognized board governance model, and the innovative Budget Based Option System (BOBs) can improve community governance and management. Participants will learn how to use these tools to jointly set result-oriented management priorities and outcomes between the elected board and the manager. This is a “hands on” interactive session taught by a current elected official and former city manager who consult nationally with clients that have successfully implemented the integrated strategic management system and the tools that support its effectiveness. Participants will learn how these tools work and have opportunities to discuss in small groups how they might be used in their communities. Practice Group: 6

Workshop Leaders: Mike Letcher, senior vice president, and William Stipp, senior vice president, The Mercer Group, Tucson, Arizona

Organizational Culture: Is There a Secret Recipe?

Organization-wide collaboration, information sharing, and the development of shared goals require trust among employees at all levels. But how do we encourage and cultivate this trust in an environment where it is lacking? Are you struggling with organizational silos and poor communication between departments? Do you have a sense of your organization’s culture? This workshop will hone the ambiguous concept of organizational culture. Program participants will learn about culture assessment tools and engage in small-group discussions focused on moving your organization to higher performance through culture change. We assess our systems and processes, why not our culture? In this workshop, we will explore how to ignite and lead culture change in our organizations, creating an environment of trust, cooperation, and purpose. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Brian Bosshardt, city manager, Bedford, Texas

Shaping the Culture of Your Organization

This workshop will focus on shaping a positive culture in your organization by bringing your values to life (contributing to the health and overall culture) through enhancing the work of leadership by everyone in the organization, becoming an engaging organization, and strengthening the probability of successful implementation by applying the concepts of change management. Practice Groups: 4, 6

Workshop Leader: Jeff Parks, president, Performance Breakthroughs, Woodbridge, Virginia

Sunday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m.–noon

“ICMA-RC Overview”: Understanding Your Retirement Options

For ICMA-RC participants who want to examine the nuts and bolts of the investment options available in their retirement plan. Topics will include in-depth information about target date and target risk funds, managed accounts, the stable value fund, and the Retirement Income Advantage fund. In addition, the full suite of financial planning services offered to ICMA-RC participants will be covered. This workshop is offered through the generous support of ICMA’s Strategic Partner ICMA-RC. There is no fee. Practice Group 18

ICMA University forums are a hybrid of traditional conference educational sessions and ICMA University workshops. Because they are designed to be highly interactive and skill-building in nature, the forums are limited in enrollment to 250 participants. Although there is no fee to participate in a forum beyond the main conference registration fee, preregistration is required because of the ceiling on enrollment, and early registration is recommended. ICMA University Practice Group numbers (noted in italics after the description) indicate the practices addressed by each forum.

City Management, Performance Evidence, and the “New Will”: Reducing Poverty, Inequality, and Racial Injustice Fifty Years after the Kerner Commission

In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, known as the Kerner Commission, concluded that urban America had made little progress in reducing poverty, inequality, and racial injustice. In its Fifty-Year Update of the Kerner Commission report, published in 2018, the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation concluded that the nation still had made little progress but had at least learned a great deal about what works and what doesn’t work. In this forum, the foundation will review the evidence on urban economic, education, criminal justice, housing, and neighborhood policies that work. Local government managers will be challenged to identify evidence-based programs in their localities and to create what the Kerner Commission called the “new will” necessary to scale up success. One goal will be to begin to overcome the present deep divisions in American society. 3, 8

Forum Leaders: Dr. Alan Curtis, president and CEO, Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, D.C.

How to Engage Residents in Sustainability Initiatives

Do you have great sustainability initiatives, but low participation in them? Join this interactive forum for strategies on engaging your residents and businesses in sustainability efforts. Discussions will also address ensuring that your zoning codes and ordinances encourage residential and commercial participation while reducing barriers for those efforts. Join this forum to learn how to encourage behavior changes through updating zoning codes, model codes, benefits of code unification, and how you can leverage your zoning code or ordinances to further your sustainability efforts. 2, 9

What We Have Is a Failure to Deliberate: Reframing Local Government Management as Deliberative Practice

Forum participants will develop awareness of deliberative practice as an alternative form of communication and participation within organizations and whole communities to address concerns including interpersonal conflict, citizen opposition, and discovery of solutions to public problems that range from mundane to wickedly complex. You will experience deliberative process through interactive exercises to name and frame issues and identify tensions and tradeoffs while considering solutions. Professional managers and students alike will access tools for supporting deliberative practice in their communities. 2, 9

Forum Leaders: Thomas Bryer, PhD, professor, Deliberative Democracy Centers, University of Florida, Orlando, Florida; Martin Carcasson, professor, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; Cheryl Hilvert, Midwest Regional Director, ICMA, Montgomery, Ohio; Doug Linkhart, president, National Civic League, Denver, Colorado; Tim Shaffer, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Communication Studies and assistant director, Institute for Civic Discourse and Democracy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas

Strengthening the City Manager/Police Chief Relationship | Friday, Oct. 18, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Preregistration is required and the fee is $395 per city team of police chief and city manager. Breakfast and lunch are included. City manager only needs to register for conference.

The police chief/city manager relationship is one of the most critical (and often most difficult) partnerships in local government management. Police chiefs and managers often come from decidedly different career backgrounds with generally little experience in the challenges and demands the other’s position carries.

Managers and their police chiefs should plan on attending this full-day preconference workshop together in order to work toward a more constructive and mutually supportive relationship between these two key officials.

Topics to be addressed include:

  • Better understanding each other’s roles
  • Defining what a high-performance manager/chief relationship looks like and obstacles to attaining it
  • Crisis communication and social media
  • Performance assessment: how to routinely evaluate the performance of the police department using criteria accepted by the manager and police chief
  • Risk management
  • Relations with other city and public agency services
  • Emerging issues, policies, and practices in policing nationally and locally.

For further information contact Leonard Matarese at Lmatarese@cpsm.us.

International Development Academy | Friday, Oct. 18, 2–6 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 19, 9 a.m.–4 p.m.

Preregistration is required, and there is an additional registration fee for this multiday event: $350 for ICMA members; $400 for nonmembers.

Are you looking for ways to make a contribution beyond the boundaries of your community? Learn how your knowledge and experience can be applied to working with local governments around the world to strengthen their capacity to promote transparent, efficient, and sustainable governance practices. Led by ICMA staff and members who have extensive international development experience, this intensive one-and-a-half-day workshop will help you understand how you can use your skills to address the challenges faced by governments to deliver services, promote economic development, create sustainable growth, and improve the quality of life for their citizens.

The session will showcase ICMA’s global portfolio as well as examine the trends and expectations of the donor community and the local governments and other entities we support. ICMA members who have made the transition to international work will discuss what is needed to be prepared. For further information, contact Harleen Kovela at hkovela@icma.org.

City/County Technology Leadership Symposium: The Manager as Technology Champion | Saturday, Oct. 19, 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

Preregistration is required, and there is an additional registration fee for this event: $195. To register, visit the PTI website.

This symposium will focus on the manager’s role in promoting effective technology practices in local government.

As the technology champion in your organization, you help create an environment where technology and innovation are recognized as assets to the entire organization. As technology champion you can—and should—be involved when it comes to strategy development and the role that IT plays in enhancing public engagement, fostering departmental collaboration, and ultimately, improving service delivery.

Topics to be addressed include:

  • The manager’s role in promoting technology and innovation
  • Building an effective manager/IT executive partnership
  • Managing technology risks across the entire enterprise
  • Why technology leadership is not about IT
  • Emerging trends in IT delivery that every manager must know.

This is not a technical session. Practitioners will share their experiences and insight for positioning the IT agency/department as an effective partner that serves the entire enterprise.

ICMA University and League of Women in Government Symposium | Saturday, Oct. 19, 12:30–4 p.m.

Preregistration is required, and there is an additional registration fee for this event: $25

The 4th Annual Symposium will feature Risha Grant, who is diversity personified! From her race, gender, and lifestyle choices, to being a young small-business owner, every area of her life exemplifies diversity. She is the founder of an award-winning diversity consulting and communications firm, as well as the creator of DiversityConneX.com, a successful online recruitment tool. Her interactive workshop will teach attendees how to reduce bias in their own organizations and increase their understanding of true diversity and inclusion through the elimination of B.S . . . Bias Synapse!

Assistants’ Exchange Program

The Conference Host Committee will offer an Assistants’ Exchange Program on Friday, October 18, prior to the Annual Conference. This is an amazing opportunity to spend the day as the guest of a participating local government in the greater Nashville area. Past participants have developed meaningful and long-lasting networks with their cohorts in the program. All ICMA assistant members are welcome. Selections will be made on a first-come, first-served basis, but efforts will be made to accommodate as many participants as feasible.

To participate, please submit the 2019 Assistants’ Exchange Registration Form by Friday, September 20 to:

Jay Evans
Assistant City Manager
City of Brentwood
jay.evans@brentwoodtn.gov

Speed Coaching | Sunday, Oct. 20, 10–11:45 a.m.

This event is free but requires preregistration.

Speed Coaching is back in Nashville! Have career questions and want to get or give a different perspective? Attend Speed Coaching on Sunday morning. Registration is complimentary for this high-energy coaching and networking event. We’re also seeking coaches!

ICMA Research Seminar for Pracademics and Students | Sunday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m.–2:45 p.m.

Join academics, practitioners, and managers who teach (“pracademics”) for research presentations in this mini-conference-in-a-conference on Sunday. Listen to current research, offer input on student and faculty pitches and on research needs in the profession, and generally get studious. Mortarboards not required.

Luncheon for Women in Professional Local Government Management | Sunday, Oct. 20, 12:45–2:45 p.m.

2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative

Nancy Tate, cochair of the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative, will provide an overview of the 72-year struggle for women to win the right to vote with passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 (ending in Tennessee by 1 vote), current efforts underway to commemorate the centennial, and ways that local governments, their communities, and/or individual ICMA members can participate in commemorating the centennial. The Initiative is an information-sharing collaborative focused on commemorating the 100th anniversary of women winning the Constitutional right to vote. From 2000 to 2015, Nancy Tate served as the executive director of the League of Women Voters of the United States, the only national successor to the women’s suffrage movement.

Fee: $45

Member Task Force and Committee Meetings | Sunday, Oct. 20, 8:30–11:30 a.m.

Most ICMA member task forces and committees will meet on Sunday morning. The start time and duration will be confirmed via email to members this summer.

Regional Meetings | Sunday, Oct. 20, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

ICMA members from the five U.S. regions will meet with their regional vice presidents to discuss key organizational issues and initiatives and to share information about activities in the region. State officers and members active in their state associations are encouraged to participate in an interactive discussion with their regional vice presidents on the ICMA Executive Board, as well as with ICMA Liaisons and Senior Advisors, to continue the dialogue on strong partnerships between ICMA and state associations.

Opportunities for professional growth and networking will extend beyond the meeting rooms of the Music City Center to include a series of educational field demonstrations and site visits highlighting innovative projects in area local governments.

Sunday, Oct. 20, 12:45–2:15 p.m.

Music City Center, Nashville

Located in the heart of Nashville, the Music City Center is not only a stunning addition to the city’s skyline but also reflects state-of-the-art technology for energy efficiency.  The Music City Center is LEED Gold certified for New Construction by the U.S. Green Building Council. Features key to the building’s LEED certification include a four-acre green roof, a 360,000-gallon rainwater collector, and an array of 845 solar panels.

This demonstration will involve walking, so wear comfortable shoes.

Fee: $25

Metro Water: Marrying History with New Technology

The Omohundro Water Treatment Plant combines the historical significance of Nashville with its current state-of-the-art operations. Originally constructed in 1929, the facility is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The bus trip takes 20 minutes.

Fee: $25